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Chris Witt
Chris Witt

Speaker, Coach, Author

chris@wittcom.com
Phone: 866.268.3084

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The "I" Personality Type
Influence, Image, Enthusiasm

 

The DISC Behavioral model describes four basic patterns, none of which is better or worse than any of the others.

Very few people are purely one type. (Most of us are a combination of types.) This description is of someone who is almost completely an I. See if it describes you or someone you know. (Again, remember it describes an extreme form of a behavior that is often much more nuanced.)

See DISC Workshop to find out how Chris Witt's programs can help your people communicate and collaborate more effectively.

If you are an I personality type, you are concerned about COMMUNICATION and PEOPLE.

  • You are optimistic, charming, and outgoing.
  • You are a "people person."
  • You genuinely like people, and you want them to like you.
  • You trust people and enjoy bringing out their best.
  • You are a consummate communicator. You enjoy telling stories and you tend to exaggerate.
  • You enjoy meeting new people, working with others, and networking.
  • You tend to ignore the rules (since you don't think they really apply to you).
  • You are energized by working with people and you energize any group you work with.
  • You see the "big picture" and you can be inspirational.
  • You dislike details and you can be scattered.

You are energized by...

  • Working with people in a fast-paced, varied environment
  • Being in the spotlight (not necessarily being in charge)
  • Tackling new projects and learning new things
  • Gaining public recognition
  • Initiating change and being able to be creative

You lose energy by...

  • Being around negative, cold, or pessimistic people
  • Performing routine, detailed tasks
  • Being held to rigid schedules
  • Working alone
  • Feeling left out
  • Being criticized in public

At your best you can...

  • Communicate a vision, mission, or goal in a way that inspires others to adopt it and work toward achieving it.
  • Be enthusiastic and creative.
  • See the best in others and you help them believe in their abilities.

You can be a visionary, a motivator, a catalyst.

When you are stressed out, you can...

  • Shirk your homework, relying on your ability to talk your way out of any trouble.
  • Lack follow — through, rarely finishing what you begin. You can overpromise and underdeliver.
  • Be superficial and glib.
  • At your worst, you can be a gossip, a blow hard, a light weight.

To be your best...

  • Develop time management skills.
  • Listen. Question. Pause. Consider.
  • Be more discriminating. Learn how to appraise people more realistically.
  • Resist the urge to do something new. Rein in your impulsiveness.

Cultivate perseverance. Become more reflective.

 

# # #

 

How to RECOGNIZE an I personality type...

  • They tend to be extroverted, friendly, and charming.
  • They speak with animation (using gestures and facial expressions), tell stories, and laugh.
  • They like to make gatherings (meetings, sales presentations, etc.) into social events.
  • They enjoy working with people, often trying to include others in their projects.

How to WORK with an I personality type...

  • Be friendly. Start your conversation in a personable way before getting down to business.
  • Help them set clear, realistic goals. Develop timetables and check back with them frequently.
  • Maintain an open door policy with them. Make them feel included.
  • Set clear objectives and time frames for any major task.
  • Look for ways to make the best use of their verbal skills.

What NOT to do around an I personality type...

  • Bore them with details.
  • Freeze them out. Exclude them. Make them feel like an outsider.
  • Ignore their ideas.
  • Expect them to cope well with bureaucracy.

 

Witt Communications offers a DISC Workshop to help professionals and organizations use the DISC Behavioral Analysis to improve leadership development, teamwork, or interpersonal effectiveness.

To learn more about how you might benefit, contact us for a free exploratory conversation. Click here.



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author: Christopher Witt
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